St. Luke's Sugar Land Hospital - Welcome
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Call today to schedule an appointment or to learn more about this service. (281) 637-7000

Each year, heart disease kills more people than any other disease. CHI St. Luke’s Health - Sugar Land Hospital provides a comprehensive set of Cardiovascular and Heart related services.

Patients at CHI St. Luke’s Health - Sugar Land Hospital benefit from the expertise of our highly qualified cardiologists, and enjoy the latest technology available in the fight against heart disease. Our services include both diagnostic and treatment services, including preventative care, diagnostic and interventional heart and peripheral procedures, diagnostic electrophysiological procedures, pacemaker and defibrillator implants, community and patient education, surgical services, and heart/pulmonary rehabilitation on both an inpatient and outpatient basis.

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More importantly, our Cardiovascular and Heart Services include:

  • Adult Congenital Heart Disease - Congenital heart disease is a type of defect in one or more structures of the heart or blood vessels that occur before birth.
    • Congenital heart defects occur while the fetus is developing in the uterus.
    • They affect 8 to 10 out of every 1,000 children. Congenital heart defects may produce symptoms atebstein anomaly birth, during childhood and sometimes not until adulthood. About 500,000 adults in the United States have grown into adulthood with congenital heart disease. This number increases by about 20,000 each year.
    • Most common heart disorders include:
      • Congenital valve defects
      • Atrial and ventricular septal defects
      • Patent Foramen Ovale
      • Patent Ductus Arteriosus
      • Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF)
      • Ebstein Anomaly
      • Coarctation of the Aorta
    • Treatment is based upon the severity of the congenital heart disease. Some mild heart defects do not require any treatment.
      • Others can be treated with medications, invasive procedures or surgery. Most adults with congenital heart disease should be monitored by a heart specialist and may need to take precautions to prevent endocarditis (an infection of the heart) throughout their life.

  • Arrhythmias - Arrhythmias, also known as abnormal heart rhythms, is an irregular or abnormal heart beat.Bradycardia
    • There are many types of arrhythmias, these include:
      • Tachycardia - Fast heart rate
      • Bradycardia - Slow heart rate
      • Supreventricular arrhythmias - Irregular rhythms that occur in the heart’s upper chamber of the heart
      • Ventricular arrhythmias - Arrhythmiasthe heart’s lower chambers
      • Bradyarrhythmias – Slow rhythms that maybe caused by disease in the heart’s conduction system
    • Treatment depends on the type and severity of your arrhythmia. In some cases, no treatment is necessary. Treatment options include medications, lifestyle changes, invasive therapies, electrical devices or surgery.

  • Aortic Disease and Marfan’s Syndrome - An aneurysm is a bulging or ballooning in the wall of a blood vessel. It is caused when a portion of the artery wall weakens. Like a balloon, as the aneurysm expands, the artery wall grows progressively thinner, increasing the likelihood that the aneurysm will burst.
    • aortic aneurysmMany diseases and conditions, such as atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries), hypertension, genetic conditions (such as Marfan Syndrome), a connective tissue disorder (such as Ehler-Danlos disorder, polychondritis, scleroderma, osteogenesis imperfecta, polycystic kidney disease, and Turners Syndrome) and injury, can cause the aorta to dilate (widen) or dissect (tear), placing you at increased risk for future life-threatening events.
    • Treatment depends on the severity and size of the aneurysm.
      • Small aneurysms (less than 5.5 cm in diameter) are not at high risk for rupturing are generally treated with medicine used to treat high blood pressure, such as a beta blocker. Beta-blockers may decrease the rate at which aneurysms grow. In general, the risks of surgery to repair smaller aneurysms outweigh the possible benefits, because smaller aneurysms rarely rupture.
      • Aortic aneurysms that are causing symptoms or enlarging rapidly are considered at risk of rupturing. Surgery is usually recommended if either of these factors is present.

  • Coronary Artery Disease - Coronary artery disease (CAD), also called heart disease, is a condition when arteries that are clogged and hardened by cholesterol and fatty buildup restrict blood flow to the heart muscle. cornary artery diseaseChest pain (angina) occurs because the heart is deprived of oxygen and nutrients. When blood supply is cut off entirely, heart attack can result.
    • Coronary artery disease risk factors include:
      • Male gender - Men have a greater risk of heart attack than women do, and men have heart attacks earlier in life than women. However, beginning at Age 70, the risk is equal for men and women.
      • Advanced age - Coronary artery disease is more likely to occur as you get older, especially after Age 65.
      • Family History - You have an increased risk of developing heart disease if you have a parent with a history of heart disease, especially if they were diagnosed before Age 50.
      • Cigarette smoking and exposure to tobacco
      • High blood pressure and high cholesterol
      • Diabetes
      • Physical inactivity
      • Being overweight
      • Uncontrolled stress or anger
    • Treatment for coronary artery disease usually involves lifestyle changes and, if necessary, drugs and certain medical procedures.
      • Lifestyle changes – Making a commitment to living a healthy lifestyle can go a long way toward promoting healthier arteries.
        • Quit Smoking
        • Eating healthy foods
        • Exercise regularly
        • Loose excess weight
        • Reduce stress
      • Drugs – If lifestyle changes aren’t enough to control your heart disease, medications may be prescribed to treat certain risk factors, such as high cholesterol or high blood pressure.
      • Procedures – Sometimes more aggressive treatment is needed.
        • Interventional procedures - Common interventional procedures to treat coronary artery disease include balloon angioplasty (PTCA) and stent or drug-eluting stent placement. These procedures are considered nonsurgical because they are done by a cardiologist (heart doctor), who accesses the heart using a long, thin tube (catheter) that is inserted into a blood vessel, rather than by a surgeon through an incision. Several types of balloons and/or catheters are available to treat the plaque build-up within the vessel wall.
        • Coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG) - One or more blocked coronary arteries are bypassed by a blood vessel graft to restore normal blood flow to the heart. These grafts usually come from the patient’s own arteries and veins located in the chest, arm or leg. The graft goes around the clogged artery (or arteries) to create new pathways for oxygen-rich blood to flow to the heart.

  • Diagnostic Imaging Services - With recent advances in technology, it is now possible to image the heart with such great detail and speed that a cardiac diagnosis can be made in seconds without an invasive procedure.
    • Depending ocardiac catheterizationn your condition, one or more of the following cardiovascular diagnostics may be ordered:
      • 12 lead EKG
      • Holter and Event monitor
      • Stress Testing
      • Echocardiograms
      • Transthoracic and Transesophageal echocardiograms
      • Vascular ultrasounds
      • Cardiac catheterization

  • Heart Failure - The term "heart failure" can be frightening. It does not mean the heart has "failed" or stopped working. It means the heart does not pump as well as it should.
    • Heart failure, also known as congestive heart failure (CHF), means your heart can't pump enough blood to meet your body's needs. Over time, conditions such as narrowed arteries in your heart (coronary artery disease) or high blood pressure gradually leave your heart too weak or stiff to fill and pump efficiently.
    • You can't reverse many conditions that lead to heart failure, but heart failure can often be treated with good results. Medications can improve the signs and symptoms of heart failure and help you live longer. Lifestyle changes, such as exercising, reducing the salt in your diet, managing stress, treating depression, and especially losing weight, can improve your quality of life.
    • Treatment - Heart failure is a chronic disease needing lifelong management. However, with treatment, signs and symptoms of heart failure can improve and the heart sometimes becomes stronger. Treatment can help you live longer and reduce your chance of dying suddenly.
      • Medications - Doctors usually treat heart failure with a combination of medications. Depending on your symptoms, you might take one or more of these drugs.
      • Surgery and Medical Devices - In some cases, doctors recommend surgery to treat the underlying problem that led to heart failure. Some treatments being studied and used in certain people include:
        • Coronary angioplasty and stenting
        • Coronary bypass surgery
        • Heart valve repair or replacement
        • Implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs)
        • Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) or biventricular pacing
        • Heart Pumps (left ventricular assist devices, or LVADs)

  • Peripheral Vascular Disease - Peripheral Vascular Disease (PVD), also known as peripheral arterial disease (PAD), atherosclerosis or hardening of the arteries is a disorder that occurs in the arteries of the circulatory system. peripheral vascularArteries are the blood vessels that carry oxygen and nutrient-rich blood from the heart to all areas of the body. PAD occurs in the arteries that carry blood to the arms and legs.
    • The rate at which PAD progresses varies with each individual and depends on many factors, including where in the body the plaque has formed and the person’s overall health.
    • Risk factors for peripheral vascular disease:
      • Smoking
      • Diabetes
      • Age: In the United States, people aged 50 and older have an increased risk for PAD
      • Race: African Americans have a two-fold higher risk of developing PAD compared to other groups
      • History of heart or blood vessel disease: A personal or family history of heart or blood vessel disease may be an indicator for PAD
      • High blood pressure (hypertension)
      • High cholesterol (hyperlipidemia)
    • Treatment options include lifestyle changes, medications and interventional procedures are the treatments available for PAD.
      • Lifestyle changes - Initial treatment of PAD includes making lifestyle changes to reduce your risk factors. Changes you can make to manage your condition include:
        • Quit Smoking
        • Eat a balance diet
        • Exercise
        • Manage other health conditions
        • Practice good foot and skin care
      • Medications may be recommended to treat conditions such as high blood pressure (anti-hypertensive medications) or high cholesterol (statin medications).
      • Procedures – In some cases, angioplasty or surgery may be necessary to treat peripheral artery disease that's causing intermittent claudication:
        • Angioplasty - In this procedure, a small hollow tube (catheter) is threaded through a blood vessel to the affected artery. There, a small balloon on the tip of the catheter is inflated to reopen the artery and flatten the blockage into the artery wall, while at the same time stretching the artery open to increase blood flow.
        • Bypass Surgery – You may need a bypass graft using a vessel from another part of your body or a blood vessel made of synthetic fabric. This technique allows blood to flow around — or bypass — the blocked or narrowed artery.

  • Valvular Heart Disease - Valvular Heart Disease is characterized by damage to or a defect in one of the four heart valves: the mitral, aortic, tricuspid or pulmonary.
    • valvular heartThe mitral and tricuspid valves control the flow of blood between the atria and the ventricles (the upper and lower chambers of the heart). The pulmonary valve controls the flow of blood from the heart to the lungs, and the aortic valve governs blood flow between the heart and the aorta, and thereby the blood vessels to the rest of the body. The mitral and aortic valves are the ones most frequently affected by valvular heart disease.
    • The severity of valvular heart disease varies. In mild cases there may be no symptoms, while in advanced cases, valvular heart disease may lead to congestive heart failure and other complications. Treatment depends upon the extent of the disease.

  • Second Opinions – Let our Physicians provide a second opinion based on a comprehensive and proven set of tests, diagnostics and evaluation program.

ARE YOU AT RISK? Take our Heart Risk Assessment